The
Driving
Factor

10%

Tours, exhibition, digital storage
June 11 — August 27 2022
station urbaner kulturen/nGbK Hellersdorf
Instagram the.driving.factor


The Driving Factor is intrigued by how the battery, as a key storage technology for "green" energy, articulates hope in electric mobility and the "energy transition". Focusing on the lithium-ion battery, the project challenges the assumption that energy can be harmlessly brought to everyone, everywhere — whether to power electric cars or scooters, mobile phones, or for stabilizing the power grid. A closer look at local contexts along the global lithium supply chain reveals the intransparent and often environmentally damaging practices of raw material extraction. Identifying the battery as part of a longer history of mineral extraction and colonial imaginaries about the future, also helps to visibilize the mechanisms through which human and non-human labor are appropriated, in a continuation of unabated imperialist and colonial logics. The Driving Factor invites its audience, artists, researchers, activists and makers to think about the lithium-ion battery otherwise, wondering: what powers power?


The Driving Factor was instigated in response to the contrasting reactions sparked by the construction of a Tesla Gigafactory in Grünheide, Brandenburg (Germany). Local and national politicians celebrated an environmentally-friendly technology set to inaugurate the mobility of the future, as well as the creation of new jobs, although Elon Musk’s company is known for deregulating its labor force while being openly anti-union. At the same time, locals started showing concern over the grave repercussions the factory will have in the already-depleted groundwater reserves, for the quality of water itself, as well as the flora and fauna of the forest cut down to make room for the factory. These concerns were largely ignored or even silenced during the public evaluation process of the gigafactory. What initially had seemed a localized conflict soon revealed global contours: was the promise of “green” mobility, especially in the strategic combination with the “energy transition”, not covering up profound violations of ecosystems and civil rights in other places too?

By focussing the lithium battery, it is possible to identify the factory nested in Brandenburg’s forest as a knot within a global-scale supply chain that is all but “green”. On the one hand, it stands out how the battery itself feeds the promises of autonomy and sustainability that in recent times are increasingly being put to work to suppress inhabitants’ legitimate concerns and needs. Thus seen, the battery functions as an allegory of a paradoxical accumulation with toxic consequences, although in an unequal planet, those affected as well as the damages vary starkly from place to place. On the other hand, The Driving Factor asks whether the battery may also be seen as an allegory of stored possibilities: suppressed but resilient ways of doing, producing, collaborating and solidarizing that operate invisibly, in the underground, capillary.

The Driving Factor approaches these two allegories in three experimental tours, moving through territories of extraction and accumulation in Berlin, Brandenburg, and Saxony. Each tour follows various cycles in the valorization and devaluation processes of raw materials and landscapes that are connected with the “energy transition”: from the reactivation of the vision of electric mobility in Berlin-Oberschöneweide and Grünheide, to the resumption of mining in Saxony’s Erzgebirge, which holds lithium deposits, to the production viz. revaluation of landscape in the aftermath of the phase-out of coal mining in Lusatia. For these journeys through both space and thought, including their echoes and ghosts from many elsewheres, The Driving Factor builds a digital repository. Podcasts, interviews, cross-readings, and video documentations, joining in through a collaborative charging process, complement the impressions of the tours and artworks—ranging from audio and video installations to radio features and performance.

Some of the artistic, scientific, and activist contributions brought together by The Driving Factor address intersectional forms of injustice relating to the production of batteries - from the contamination of ecosystems to exploitation and expulsions of humans, animals and plants. Others explore the use of batteries and thereby, bring further paradoxes to the fore. For one, lithium batteries are only partially recyclable and difficult to dispose of; this means high costs, also in terms of needed electricity, and new environmental as well as health threats (adding to those caused by depositing matter on the ground at the sites of production). Moreover, the electricity grids that ought to be fueled by renewables and stabilized by batteries, are at many places yet to be built—or the renewables are not available in the needed quantities.

In the year 2022, Europe's transition to the emissions-free and resource-saving energy provision that many expected from the European “Green Deal”, has been pushed to an even further and more insecure future by the war in Ukraine. From The Driving Factor's translocal and postnational perspective, that expectation can only be explained as a peculiar insistence on linear models of growth and investment aimed at securing private capital and business as usual. The most innovative technologies, often simple, "soft" technologies, and effective movements of our days, however, have long taken different paths. They are the possibilities stored in everyday life which The Driving Factor would like to help wire and multiply.



Contributors:
Helmuth Albrecht (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Ana Alenso, Martin Bertau (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Cristóbal Bonelli (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Inge Broska, Bürgerinitiative Grünheide, Aurora Castillo, Oscar Choque (Ayni, Verein für Ressourcengerechtigkeit e.V.), Perpeto Dyese Wabanza, Constanze Fischbeck, Elizabeth Gallon Droste, Michelle Geraerts (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Eva Hertzsch und Adam Page mit Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart-Gemeinschaftsschule und Victor-Klemperer-Kolleg Berlin, Sonja Hornung, Esther Kasongo Muntwabane, Maryam Katan, knowbotiq (Yvonne Wilhelm, Christian Huebler), Jan Müggenburg (Leuphana Universität Lüneburg), Éric Mutombo, Susan Newman (The Open University), Canay Özden-Schilling (National University of Singapore), Susanne Reumschüssel (Industriesalon Schöneweide), Andrea Riedel (Stadt- und Bergbaumuseum Freiberg), Leni Roller, Heidemarie Schröder (Wassertafel Berlin Brandenburg), Pablo Torres, Thomas Turnbull (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte), Jens Weber (Grüne Liga Osterzgebirge e.V.), Jack Wolf and many others.

The Driving Factor is: Elisa T. Bertuzzo, Jan Lemitz, Daniele Tognozzi, Mercedes Villalba, Neli Wagner.


The Driving Factor befasst sich mit dem aberwitzigem Vertrauen in der Batterie als Speichertechnologie „grüner“ Energie und Hoffnungsträgerin der Elektromobilität sowie der „Energiewende“. Das Projekt nimmt die Lithiumbatterie unter die Lupe und hinterfragt das Narrativ des schadlosen „grünen“ Speicherblocks für alle und überall—ob in Elektroautos, e-Rollers, Mobiltelefonen, oder zur Stabilisierung der Stromnetze. Eine nähere Betrachtung lokaler Zusammenhänge entlang der globalen Lithium-Lieferkette entlarvt intransparente und oft umweltschädigende Praktiken der Rohstoffförderung, sowie Mechanismen der Aneignung von Natur- und menschlicher Arbeit, denen nie überwundene imperialistische und kolonialistische Logiken zugrunde liegen. Im Kollektiv und in den vielstimmigen Beiträgen von Künstler*innen, Forschenden, Aktivist*innen und Praktiker*innen suchen wir nach Antworten auf die Frage: Woher rührt die Macht der „Speicherbarkeit“ von Energie?


Am Anfang von The Driving Factor war Verwunderung über die konträren Reaktionen, die der Bau einer Tesla-Gigafactory in Grünheide, Brandenburg, erweckt hatte. Auf regionaler und nationaler Ebene feierte die Politik eine angeblich umweltfreundliche Technologie, die die Mobilität der Zukunft einleiten sollte, sowie die Schaffung von Arbeitsplätzen, obgleich die Firma von Elon Musk für deregulierte Jobs und die konsequente Missachtung von Arbeiter*innenrechte bekannt ist. Währenddessen wurden die Bedenken und unzählige Einwendungen von Bewohner*innen zu den Folgen für die Wasserqualität, für die Grundwasserbestände sowie für die Flora und Fauna des gerodeten Walds grob ignoriert. Was zunächst wie ein lokaler Konflikt aussah, nahm peu à peu globale Konturen an: Deckten die hochklingenden Versprechen von „grüner“ Mobilität, besonders in der strategischen Verbindung mit der „Energiewende“, nicht auch andernorts gefährliche Interventionen in bereits angeschlagenen Ökosystemen ab?

Die Lithiumbatterie lässt die Fabrik im Brandenburger Wald als Knoten entlang einer weltumspannenden und überhaupt nicht „grünen“ Lieferkette aufscheinen. Einerseits nährt sie die Versprechen von Autonomie und Nachhaltigkeit, in deren Namen zivilgesellschaftliche Rechte neuerdings immer wieder unterwandert werden können. Damit wird die Batterie zum Sinnbild eines paradoxen Akkumulierens mit toxischen Folgen, obwohl die Betroffenen ebenso wie die verrichteten Schäden in einem ungleichen Planeten stark variieren. Andererseits fragt The Driving Factor, ob die Batterie auch als Sinnbild von gespeicherten Reserve-Möglichkeiten gesehen werden könnte: in Form von unterdrückten, aber ungesehen, unterirdisch oder kapillar wirksamen, resilienten Formen des Tuns, Produzierens, Kollaborierens, und Solidarisierens.

Das Projekt nähert sich diesen beiden Sinnbildern künstlerisch-multidisziplinär, mit drei Touren durch Territorien der Extraktion und Akkumulation in Berlin, Brandenburg, und Sachsen. Jede Tour macht Zyklen der Auf- und Abwertung von Rohstoffen und Landschaften nachvollziehbar, die in Zusammenhang mit der „Energiewende“ stehen: die Reaktivierung der Vision von Elektromobilität in Berlin-Oberschöneweide und Grünheide; die Wiederaufnahme des Bergbaus nach dem Fund von Lithiumvorkommen im Erzgebirge; und die Produktion bzw. Neu-Verwertung von Landschaft nach dem Ausstieg aus dem Kohleabbau in der Lausitz. Für diese räumlichen wie gedanklichen Touren einschließlich deren Echos, gar Gespenster, von vielen Anderswos konstruiert The Driving Factor ein digitales Repositorium. Im kollaborativen Ladeprozess kommen zu Spiegelungen der Touren und künstlerischen Arbeiten—die in Medien von Ton und Video bis hin zur Radioschaltung und Performance realisiert wurden—Video-Dokumentationen, Podcasts, Interviews, und Cross-Readings, hinzu.

Einige der von The Driving Factor gesammelten Positionen behandeln intersektionale Ungerechtigkeiten im Kontext der Batterieproduktion: Verschmutzungen von Ökosystemen, Ausbeutung und Vertreibungen von Menschen, Tierarten und Pflanzen. Andere richten ihr Augenmerk auf die Batterienutzung und konfrontieren somit weitere Paradoxen. Denn zum einen lassen sich die Lithiumbatterien nur teilweise recyceln und schwer entsorgen; dies verursacht hohe Kosten, auch im Hinblick auf den Chemikalien- und Stromverbrauch, und neue ökologische sowie gesundheitliche Gefährdungen (zusätzlich zu denen der Abraum-Lagerung an den Produktionsorten). Zum anderen sind entweder die mit erneuerbaren Energien zu beliefernden Stromnetze, die durch die Batterien stabilisiert werden sollten, an vielen Orten gar nicht fertiggestellt—oder die erneuerbaren Energien in den nötigen Mengen lange noch nicht verfügbar.

Der Übergang von Europa hin zur emissionsfreien und ressourcenschonenden Energienutzung, die sich viele vom „Green Deal“ versprachen, ist 2022 mit dem Ukraine-Krieg in noch weitere Ferne gerückt. Aus der translokalen und postnationalen Perspektive von The Driving Factor erklären sich solche Versprechen ohnehin nur als eigentümliches Beharren auf linearen Wachstums- und Investitionsmodellen, die privates Kapital und the business as usual sichern sollten. Die innovativsten Technologien, die oft auf relativ einfache, „soft technologies“ zurückgehen, und wirksamsten Bewegungen unserer Zeit folgen indessen völlig anderen Modellen: Sie stellen Reserve-Möglichkeiten im Alltag dar, die The Driving Factor weiter verkabeln und vervielfältigen möchte.


Mitwirkende:
Helmuth Albrecht (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Ana Alenso, Martin Bertau (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Cristóbal Bonelli (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Inge Broska, Bürgerinitiative Grünheide, Aurora Castillo, Oscar Choque (Ayni, Verein für Ressourcengerechtigkeit e.V.), Perpeto Dyese Wabanza, Constanze Fischbeck, Elizabeth Gallon Droste, Michelle Geraerts (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Eva Hertzsch und Adam Page mit Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart-Gemeinschaftsschule und Victor-Klemperer-Kolleg Berlin, Sonja Hornung, Esther Kasongo Muntwabane, Maryam Katan, knowbotiq (Yvonne Wilhelm, Christian Huebler), Jan Müggenburg (Leuphana Universität Lüneburg), Éric Mutombo, Susan Newman (The Open University), Canay Özden-Schilling (National University of Singapore), Susanne Reumschüssel (Industriesalon Schöneweide), Andrea Riedel (Stadt- und Bergbaumuseum Freiberg), Leni Roller, Heidemarie Schröder (Wassertafel Berlin Brandenburg), Pablo Torres, Thomas Turnbull (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte), Jens Weber (Grüne Liga Osterzgebirge e.V.), Jack Wolf und viele andere.

The Driving Factor sind: Elisa T. Bertuzzo, Jan Lemitz, Daniele Tognozzi, Mercedes Villalba, Neli Wagner.


The Driving Factor está intrigado por la forma en que la batería, como tecnología clave de almacenamiento de energía "verde", articula la esperanza en la posibilidad de una transición energética impulsada por la movilidad eléctrica. Centrándose en la batería de iones de litio, el proyecto pone en tela de juicio la suposición de que la energía puede llegar sin peligro a todo el mundo y a todas partes, ya sea para alimentar coches o scooters eléctricos, teléfonos móviles o para estabilizar la red eléctrica. Al igual que sus predecesores minerales, el litio depende de una cadena de suministro extractiva que a menudo da lugar a prácticas ecológicas profundamente perjudiciales. Situar la batería como parte de una historia más larga de extracción de minerales e imaginarios coloniales sobre el futuro nos ayuda a visibilizar los mecanismos a través de los cuales se sigue explotando el trabajo humano y no humano. The Driving Factor invita a su público, artistas, investigadores, activistas y creadores a pensar en la batería de iones de litio de otra manera, preguntándose: ¿qué potencia el poder?


Pensando en esta fábrica anidada en el bosque de Brandenburgo como un nudo dentro de una cadena de suministro a escala mundial, la batería funciona como una alegoría de la acumulación paradójica con consecuencias tóxicas. Aunque en un planeta desigual, tanto los afectados como los daños varían notablemente de un lugar a otro. The Driving Factor se pregunta si la batería puede verse también como una alegoría de las posibilidades almacenadas: formas suprimidas pero resistentes de hacer, producir, colaborar y solidarizarse que operan de forma invisible, en el subsuelo, capilar.

The Driving Factor aborda estas dos alegorías en tres recorridos experimentales, moviéndose por territorios de extracción y acumulación en Berlín, Brandeburgo y Sajonia. Cada recorrido sigue varios ciclos de valorización y devaluación de materias primas y paisajes relacionados con la "transición energética": desde la reactivación de la visión de la movilidad eléctrica en Berlín-Oberschöneweide y Grünheide, pasando por la reapertura de la minería en el Erzgebirge de Sajonia (que alberga yacimientos de litio) hasta la producción y revalorización del paisaje tras el abandono de la minería del carbón en Lusacia. Para estos viajes a través del espacio y el pensamiento, incluyendo sus ecos y fantasmas de muchos otros lugares, The Driving Factor construye este repositorio digital por el que estás navegando. Podcasts, entrevistas, lecturas cruzadas y documentaciones en vídeo, que se unen a través de un proceso de carga colaborativa, complementan las impresiones de los recorridos y las obras de arte, que van desde las instalaciones de audio y vídeo hasta los reportajes radiofónicos y la performance.

Algunas de las contribuciones artísticas, científicas y activistas reunidas por The Driving Factor abordan formas interseccionales de injusticia relacionadas con la producción de pilas, desde la contaminación de los ecosistemas hasta la explotación y expulsión de seres humanos, animales y plantas. Otros exploran el uso de las pilas y, por tanto, ponen de manifiesto otras paradojas. Por un lado, las baterías de litio son sólo parcialmente reciclables y difíciles de eliminar, por lo que cabe esperar nuevas amenazas medioambientales y sanitarias (que se suman a las causadas por el depósito de materia en el suelo en los lugares de producción). Además, las redes eléctricas que deberían estar alimentadas por energías renovables y estabilizadas por baterías, en muchos lugares aún no se han construido, o las energías renovables no están disponibles en las cantidades necesarias.
Si pensamos en la Europa de 2022, la transición hacia el suministro de energía sin emisiones y con ahorro de recursos que muchos esperaban del "Green Deal" europeo, se ha visto empujada a un futuro aún más lejano e inseguro por la guerra de Ucrania. Desde la perspectiva translocal y posnacional que adopta el proyecto, esa expectativa sólo puede explicarse como una peculiar insistencia en modelos lineales de crecimiento e inversión destinados a asegurar el capital privado y los negocios como siempre. Sin embargo, las tecnologías más innovadoras (a menudo simples y blandas) y los movimientos más eficaces de nuestros días hace tiempo que tomaron caminos diferentes. Son las posibilidades almacenadas en la vida cotidiana que The Driving Factor quisiera ayudar a cablear y multiplicar.


Contribuyentes:
Helmuth Albrecht (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Ana Alenso, Martin Bertau (TU Bergakademie Freiberg), Cristóbal Bonelli (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Inge Broska, Bürgerinitiative Grünheide, Aurora Castillo, Oscar Choque (Ayni, Verein für Ressourcengerechtigkeit e.V.), Perpeto Dyese Wabanza, Constanze Fischbeck, Elizabeth Gallon Droste, Michelle Geraerts (University of Amsterdam, ERC Worlds of Lithium), Eva Hertzsch und Adam Page mit Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart-Gemeinschaftsschule und Victor-Klemperer-Kolleg Berlin, Sonja Hornung, Esther Kasongo Muntwabane, Maryam Katan, knowbotiq (Yvonne Wilhelm, Christian Huebler), Jan Müggenburg (Leuphana Universität Lüneburg), Éric Mutombo, Susan Newman (The Open University), Canay Özden-Schilling (National University of Singapore), Susanne Reumschüssel (Industriesalon Schöneweide), Andrea Riedel (Stadt- und Bergbaumuseum Freiberg), Leni Roller, Heidemarie Schröder (Wassertafel Berlin Brandenburg), Pablo Torres, Thomas Turnbull (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte), Jens Weber (Grüne Liga Osterzgebirge e.V.), Jack Wolf y muchos otros.

The Driving Factor es: Elisa T. Bertuzzo, Jan Lemitz, Daniele Tognozzi, Mercedes Villalba, Neli Wagner